Attractions

Wallace Area Attractions

Wallace and its surrounding area offer a nearly endless list of recreational and cultural adventures. Dig into Wallace’s past via fascinating museums, theater and interactive historic tours. Get set for adventure with year-round outdoor recreation including road and mountain biking, hiking, golfing, snow sports, fishing, and off-road fun.

  • Biking

    Biking

    Cycling enthusiasts flock to the Silver Valley and North Idaho to ride some of the most scenic paved and non-motorized trails in America.

    Route of the Hiawatha

    One of the most breathtaking, scenic paved and non-motorized stretches of railroad in the country, the Route of the Hiawatha is the “crown jewel” of rail-to-trail mountain bicycle trails. Winding through 10 tunnels and 7 mountain high trestles, this 15-mile route crosses the rugged Bitterroot Mountains between Idaho and Montana. The Route of the Hiawatha is best known for the long, dark Taft or St. Paul Pass Tunnel which burrows for 1.66 miles under the Idaho/Montana border. Dating from 1906, construction of the old Milwaukee Road railroad route was a story of hardship, calamity and triumph. The ride is easy, safe and downhill. Trail passes and bicycle rentals are available at the Lookout Pass Resort at Exit 0 off I-90 on the Idaho/Montana border. The trailhead is located 3 miles from the Taft exit at milepost 5 on I-90 in Montana. For your return trip, shuttle service is available.

    (208) 744-1301

    Trail of The Coeur d’Alenes

    The magnificent 72-mileTrail of the Coeur d’Alenes traverses almost the entire breadth of North Idaho – through the mountainous Silver Valley, into the chain lakes region, along the shore of Lake Coeur d’Alene, over the Chatcolet Bridge and to the Palouse prairie. Catch glimpses of water fowl, deer, elk, moose, otters, osprey, bald eagles and abundant flora. The Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes is the longest, continuous, non-motorized, paved trail in the nation. Rest stops are well-placed, riding is easy and quaint communities provide easy access to food and refreshments.

    (208) 682-3814

    Mountain & Bike Trails

    The Idaho Panhandle National Forest and the local network of over 1000 miles of trails, paths, and roads offer adventure and fun for bike riders of all abilities. Choose from extra wide U.S. Forest Service Roads to single-track scrambles, and everything in-between. Favorite trails are the Nor-Pac, Cranky Gulch, Two Mile, Golconda, and Upper Glidden Lake at Cooper Pass. Please contact the Guest Services Representatives at the Stardust Motel for more information on local biking opportunities.

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  • Skiing, Snowboarding, and Snowshoeing

    Skiing, Snowboarding, and Snowshoeing

    Winter sports adventure abounds in the majestic mountains surrounding Wallace, Idaho. Uniquely positioned between two first-class ski resorts, Lookout Pass to the east and Silver Mountain to the west, the Stardust Motel is an ideal home base. An extensive network of pristine trails provide for incomparable cross-country skiing and snowshoeing.

    Lookout Pass Ski and Recreation Area

    The Best Snow in Idaho! Lookout Pass has a reputation for legendary powder, the earliest openings, and the longest seasons in the region. Located 10 miles east of Wallace on the Idaho/Montana border, Lookout is the “Favorite Family Ski Area” with easy access, a relaxed atmosphere, and great value. Home to a nationally recognized Free Ski School Program for children, Lookout attracts boarders and skiers of all skill ranges and ages.

    Open Thursday – Monday (208) 744-1301

    Silver Mountain Resort

    Ride the world’s longest single-stage gondola 3,000 feet up to Silver Mountain. Multiple chairs spread across the Resort which spans two mountains, 73 trails and 1,600 acres of terrain and boasts more than 300 inches of snow annually. Silver Mountain is a first rate ski resort that still retains its local charm. Located 10 miles west of the Stardust Motel at Exit 49 on Interstate-90.

    (208) 783-1111

    Snowshoeing

    The Idaho Panhandle National Forest and the local network of over 1000 miles of trails, paths, and roads offer a range of snowshoeing choices from wide-open bowls to steep, single-track hill paths. Please consult the Stardust Motel Guest Services Representatives for more information on local snowshoeing opportunities.

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  • Museums

    Museums

    Historic Wallace and the Silver Valley offer many museums which provide visitors with a deeper understanding of the area’s remarkable culture and heritage. Walk to museums in downtown Wallace, and drive to nearby Kellogg and Mullan for even more historical adventure.

    Northern Pacific Depot Railroad Museum

    This beautiful, chateau style railroad depot-turned museum houses artifacts, interpretive displays and photographs demonstrating the major role railroads played in the history of Wallace and the West. In 1985, the Depot was saved from destruction by the construction of an I-90 overpass. This 90-ton building was transported in four hours across the South Fork of the Coeur d’Alene River to its present location.

    Wallace District Mining Museum

    The Silver Capital of the World is chronicled through an array of mining exhibits, historic photographs and an informative video which document the people and the events that shaped the town, the state and the nation.

    Oasis Bordello Museum

    This museum and tour, set in an actual brothel, provide a tasteful and entertaining picture of the mining-camp past. The Oasis Rooms began as a hotel and saloon in 1895 and closed as an operating “hotel” in 1988.

    Staff House Museum

    Dedicated to preserving the mining, smelting, and cultural history of the Silver Valley, the Staff House Museum is located in Kellogg in the 104 year old Bunker Hill Company Staff House, and features 13 exhibit rooms as well as outdoor exhibits.

    Captain John Mullan Museum

    Captain John Mullan opened the Pacific Northwest to growth and exploration through construction of the Mullan Road from 1859 to 1862. This museum chronicles the history of the Road and the town of Mullan.

    Old Mission State Park

    The oldest standing building in all of Idaho, the magnificent Mission of the Sacred Heart was constructed in the 1850s by Jesuit missionaries and members of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe. High on a grassy knoll overlooking the Coeur d’Alene River, the design by Father Ravalli evokes Italian Renaissance church architecture. The Mission was built, however, with indigenous materials and Native American craftsmanship. Old Mission State Park and the Mission of the Sacred Heart are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Visitors can explore the restored Parish House and an historic cemetery. A new Visitor Center includes a gift shop and an interpretive movie.

    A trailhead of the 72-mile long Trail of the Coeur d'Alenes is near the Park, in the town of Cataldo, and provides easy access for bikers, walkers, runners, and rollerbladers.

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  • Hiking

    Hiking

    The mountains, lakes and rivers of North Idaho offer hikers adventure and beauty whether on day-hikes or extended backpacking trips. Listed below are some favorite trails from among the dozens that honeycomb the Idaho Panhandle National Forest.

    The Pulaski Trail

    The Pulaski Tunnel Trail offers both the beauty of a cool walk in the forest and an adventure into the past. The two-mile course brings hikers to a spot across Placer Creek from the historic Pulaski Tunnel, the abandoned mine where “Big Ed” Pulaski saved all but five of his 45-man firefighting crew in the Great Fire of 1910. The trail has numerous interpretive signs. Both the trail and the mine are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Within the firefighting community, Pulaski is also remembered for refining the two bladed tool that bears his name. The Pulaski Tunnel Trail is a beautiful hike and a national shrine.

    St. Joe Divide Trail # 16

    The St. Joe Divide trail follows the St. Joe-Coeur d’Alene Divide for 22 miles along the high ridge that separates the Coeur d’Alene River and St. Joe River watersheds. Some of the trail has been bladed for four wheel drive vehicles. This trail meanders through a mature forest of lodgepole pine with a myriad of other pines and firs. Colorful wildflowers and signs of wildlife abound. The trail intersects with six access trails on its way to Kellogg Peak. Excellent for horse and trail bike travel.

    Cranky Gulch Trail #39

    Cranky Gulch trail begins about 2.2 miles south of Wallace as a primitive one mile road along Cranky Gulch Creek to an abandoned diamond drilling operation. The 18 inch trail begins there and continues along the creek through part of the 1910 Burn. Several gray snags tower above the lush green forest canopy as remaining vestiges of the famous fire. The trail climbs through two switchbacks and ends with a panoramic view of Burke, Idaho and Tiger, Good, Sunset and Pulaski Peaks. Huckleberries can be plentiful.

    Stevens Lake Trail #165

    The Stevens Peak-Alpine Lakes area is known for magnificent scenery. Stevens Peak, at 6838 feet, towers above nearby mountains. Lower and Upper Stevens Lakes provide good fishing and are stocked periodically by the State of Idaho with Eastern Brook and Rainbow. The trail contains steep ascents, towering larch, hemlock and Douglas fir, majestic rock formations, flat, brushy areas and cascading waterfalls. Signs of big game are numerous. Excellent for camping, swimming, hiking, berry-picking and photography.

    Upper Glidden Lake Trail #135

    Upper Glidden Lake trail, easy and scenic, starts 12.5 miles north of Wallace and travels to a high alpine lake. The trail begins in an open stand of grand fir, sub-alpine fir and western hemlock with a bear grass and huckleberry understory. The trail follows the contour from Cooper Pass and climbs to the northeast edge of Upper Glidden Lake. The lake area offers camping, fishing, berry-picking and photography. Cross-country skiing and snowshoe winter camping are also possible.

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  • Mine Tours

    Mine Tours

    Seize a rare and exciting opportunity to explore historic mining tunnels and operations, world famous for producing silver, gold, lead, and zinc. These safe, informative adventures are a must-see for those hoping to learn more about Wallace’s mining past.

    Sierra Silver Mine Tour

    Wallace and the surrounding area are recognized as the richest silver mining district on earth having produced 1.2 billion ounces since 1884. Catch the trolley in downtown Wallace and dig a little deeper into these rich mountains and into their storied past. On the Sierra Silver Mine Tour, an experienced miner guides you through the main drift of an actual underground silver mine. Exhibits and demonstrations of mining equipment present historic and modern techniques used to mine silver, gold, lead, zinc, and copper.Your guide will share his experiences as a hard-rock miner in the Coeur d'Alene District. The stories, demonstrations, and exhibits included in the Sierra Silver Mine Tour are entertaining and educational for visitors of all ages and interests.

    (208) 752-5151

    Crystal Gold Mine Tour

    Glimpse an authentic 1880s underground gold mine. Hidden and lost for over one hundred years, the Crystal Gold Mine was rediscovered in 1996. It was named for the beautiful smithsonite crystals formed on the walls over the last century. Gold and wire silver, still attached to the quartz vein, are clearly marked. You can even try your hand at panning for gold.

    (208) 783-4653

    Mining Heritage Exhibit

    Explore our mining heritage at the Wallace Chamber of Commerce Visitors Center, a short walk from the Stardust Motel, at Exit 61 off I-90. Displays show a blasting tunnel, a mule hoist, a shoring tunnel, ore samples and much more.

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  • Snowmobiles and ATV’s

    Snowmobiles and ATV’s

    Wallace is surrounded by huge swaths of U.S Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management property, providing over 1,000 miles of connected, all season trails, from wide open roads, to meandering paths, to single track blasts.

    The City is Wallace is off-road vehicle friendly. Downtown streets and the county roads leading out of town permit ATV and snowmobile riding. Once you arrive, you can park your trailer at the Stardust Motel and ride from there. Door-to-door motorized recreation is the rule of the road in Wallace.

    From Wallace, you can climb into the Bitteroot Mountains, and ride to the historic and scenic towns of Pritchard, Avery, Murray, Mullan, Coeur d’Alene, Pinehurst, Enaville, Clark Fork, Noxon, Sandpoint and more. With the motorized vehicle of your choice, the wildlands surrounding the Silver Valley become your playground.

    Maps, guides and helpful advice are available at the Stardust Motel. We can suggest our favorite rides, trails, and haunts. The United States Forest Service office provides maps and trail updates.

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  • Theater

    Theater

    Since 1984, the Sixth Street Melodrama has entertained audiences in its cozy 80-seat theater with rollicking melodramas and musical variety shows. The Melodrama is housed in the Lux Building, dating from 1891, the oldest remaining wood frame building in the historic business district. Audience participation is not only invited, it is required. Come join in this Western theatrical tradition – and have a barrel of fun.

    Since 1984, the Sixth Street Melodrama has entertained audiences in its cozy 80-seat theater with rollicking melodramas and musical variety shows. The Melodrama is housed in the Lux Building, dating from 1891, the oldest remaining wood frame building in the historic business district. Audience participation is not only invited, it is required. Come join in this Western theatrical tradition – and have a barrel of fun.

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